4K Video with HDR: Dolby Vision or HDR10?

According to ABI Research, TV manufacturers are offering high dynamic range (HDR) in 4K TV sets to increase their market appeal, but many ...

According to ABI Research, consolidation in the set-top box market is not over.
According to ABI Research, consolidation in the set-top box market is not over.

According to ABI Research, TV manufacturers are offering high dynamic range (HDR) in 4K TV sets to increase their market appeal, but many are still struggling to choose between one of two new video standards: Dolby Vision and HDR10. An open standard, HDR10 is intended to allow firmware updates and has the support of more manufacturers than Dolby Vision. But this may change in the months ahead, as a number of content creators, including HBO, Paramount, Sony Pictures, and Universal, rally in support of Dolby Vision.

"The winner in the HDR10 and Dolby Vision competition is not yet clear," said Khin Sandi Lynn, industry analyst at ABI. "Dolby Vision currently supports higher light output levels than HDR10 and is better suited to adjust to different manufacturers' displays. But its downside is that, unlike HDR10, the standard requires built-in hardware, more costly IP licensing, and involves a certification process for licensing."

ABI predicts that in the battle between Dolby Vision and HDR10, one possibility will be that Dolby Vision becomes the format for streaming movie and VOD delivery, while HDR10 primarily supports live event and broadcast channels. Consumers viewing content from a service supporting Dolby Vision on a non-supported TV set will likely not receive HDR signals. Instead, the TV will use color upsampling technologies to simulate the HDR brightness and saturation.

"Setting aside the fight between standards, some markets with less pervasive broadband deployments, like India, will need to perform infrastructure upgrades to support necessary bandwidth for 4K video service delivery," said Lynn. "This will further help to increase the 4K TV adoption in the Asia-Pacific region in which currently only 5% of TV households own 4K sets."

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