Consumers Name Cost as Major High-Speed Data Hurdle

Cost is the major barrier that is keeping people who haven’t already taken up high-speed data services from doing so, according to recent data from the FCC (www.fcc.gov). The Commission just released the results of a national random survey it conducted of adults...

Feb 24th, 2010
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Cost is the major barrier that is keeping people who haven’t already taken up high-speed data services from doing so, according to recent data from the FCC (www.fcc.gov). The Commission just released the results of a national random survey it conducted of adults in October and November 2009 to assess attitudes toward broadband. The survey found that 35% of adult Americans do not have high-speed Internet connections at home -- or approximately 80 million adults and 13 million children over the age of five.



More than a third -- 36 percent of non-adopters, or 28 million adults -- said they do not have home broadband because they feel the monthly fee is too expensive (15%), they cannot afford a computer, the installation fee is too high (10%), or they do not want to enter into a long-term service contract (9%).

The FCC survey also indicated that digital literacy problems as well as some people’s belief that high-speed data services lacked relevance to their lives were major stumbling blocks to high-speed data adoption.



NCTA (www.ncta.com) President and CEO Kyle McSlarrow responded to the FCC’s “Broadband Adoption and Use in America” survey results by pointing out that major cable operators recently proposed an “Adoption Plus” broadband program targeted at millions of middle-school students from low-income families that would combine discounted service and equipment with digital literacy training. "We are committed to working with the FCC and other stakeholders on ‘A+’ or other similar programs that attack the key barriers to broadband adoption, and support efforts in Congress by Sen. Rockefeller and Reps. Markey and Matsui to increase broadband adoption among low-income families,” McSlarrow said in a statement.

The FCC released the survey results as a lead-up to its planned delivery of a National Broadband Plan to Congress on March 17.
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